06 June 2010

Diner Ten by Ivor W. Hartmann

"It is we who rule this earth, don't let anyone tell you otherwise. We have existed, simply, in our present modern form for over 150 million years, and only it took us 3.8 billion years to get there from virtually single-celled organisms. Every other multi-celled organism on our planet, including humans, is as far as we are concerned, just passing through..." -Master-Teacher Tagam.



This story has been selected for the StoryTime anthology African Roar 2011, please go to the African Roar site for more info.



Diner Ten was written by Ivor W. Hartmann.

Copyright © Ivor W. Hartmann 2010.




Ivor W. Hartmann, is a Zimbabwean writer. He is the author of Mr. Goop (Vivlia, 2010), and was nominated for the UMA Award (2009), and awarded The Golden Baobab Prize (2009). His writing has appeared in African Writing Magazine, Wordsetc, Munyori Literary Journal, Something Wicked, and Sentinel Literary Quarterly, amongst others. He is the editor/publisher of StoryTime, and co-editor/publisher African Roar, and on the advisory board of Writers International Network Zimbabwe.





13 comments:

ozioma Izuora said...

This is creativity par excellence! A very human reflection from our often ignored strata of the ecosystem. Reminds one of 'Fate Of A Cockroach', a beautiful Egyptian play. Well done Ivor.

Ivor W. Hartmann said...

Thank You Ozioma! It's like that saying what is god to a tree? Well its a tree of course! :). Sounds interesting I'll certainly look that play up.

Myne Whitman said...

I started reading and couldn't stop. This was very creative indeed and I enjoyed it, especially the parallels with humanity, the questions about life. That ending, hmmm...

Ivor W. Hartmann said...

Good to hear Myne :). The story was inspired by a cockroach infestation in my flat, one I put up with it until I couldn't any more. Though I spent a fair amount time before that just observing them, wondering about their lives, and what it like to be one :). What about the ending?

Phénix said...

Ivor, I'm so glad I took the time to read this. A singularly interesting perspective indeed! I can see a Broadway musical in the pipeline. You had a clever use of intrigue and mystery in the beginning. Once the readers work out what you are going on about, they are hooked. From then on, it's the sheer fascination tinged with horror that would make them read until the end. Excellent read!

Ivor W. Hartmann said...

I'm glad you did too Hajira :). Hmm a musical, that would be cool, as long as I don't have to watch it more than once he he. Yes I like do doing that :) and specifically didn't even once give out the actual name of Radic's species. It's sad I killed him off at the end (I do this quite often to my lead characters) as I grew to really like him, will have go back in time if I write more about him.

Abdul said...

waaw! I really liked this. The kind of story that pushes boundaries,. Well detailed and captivating. Never thought of cockroaches in this manner. And I like the ending

Ivor W. Hartmann said...

Hi Abdul, thank you, happy you enjoyed it. Yes, I always get a kick out of trying to see the world from a different perspective to the average human perspective, interesting things always tend to happen when you do and try to capture that in a story.

Abdul Adan said...

That's right Ivor. This kind of story simply shows how limitless the boundaries of literature are.

Fredrick Chiagozie Nwonwu said...

Bravo! I thoroughly enjoyed myself. I like the fact that you gifted Radic and his kind intelligence, made him a much more believable character. Yeah, I agree that this piece highlights the limitlessness of creative boundaries where it concerns literature.

Fredrick Chiagozie Nwonwu said...

Bravo! I thoroughly enjoyed myself. I like the fact that you gifted Radic and his kind intelligence, made him a much more believable character. Yeah, I agree that this piece highlights the limitlessness of creative boundaries where it concerns literature.

Abdul Adan said...

That's right Ivor. This kind of story simply shows how limitless the boundaries of literature are.

ozioma Izuora said...

This is creativity par excellence! A very human reflection from our often ignored strata of the ecosystem. Reminds one of 'Fate Of A Cockroach', a beautiful Egyptian play. Well done Ivor.

 
StoryTime: Weekly Fiction by African Writers.
All works published in StoryTime are
Copyrighted ©.
All rights reserved.